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« To Fly or Not to Fly (Sujatha) | Main | Aliens: From Mars to Arizona »

April 22, 2010

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But of course! Nature had a grand purpose for the Wisteria after all. Here I was, thinking of the Wisteria as the Komodo Dragon of the plant world. A dramatically massive growth covered one side of the Deer Head Inn, a once elegant hotel in Delaware Water Gap, PA. You could see that the inn was no match for its parasitic guest which had contorted the structure over the years.

I have had to be careful not to fall asleep on my patio on a summer afternoon lest the Wisteria on the trellis send out its feelers to strangle me. It certainly had designs on my Cherry tree. It is such a rapid grower in season that to cut it once a week is to lose the battle. Just picking up and carting a trash bin full of the clippings was exhausting. After seven years of this I gave up. It took two strong men (I could only kibitz) to hack it down, then dig a two foot deep hole to uproot it. An attempted murder at best because the bloody thing keeps reappearing. Wouldn't you know it, my neighbor built a high fence and his landscaper planted Wisteria against it. Every day I look out of my kitchen window dreading the chore of having now to trim HIS parasite. Another neighbor, blissfully Wisteria free, was extolling the beauty of the plant. True, Wisteria flowers have a wonderful perfume that lingers in the neighborhood for days, but the damn thing blooms once in a blue moon - every seven years judging from mine. It's a high price to pay for such meager rewards.

Count on the Japanese to have put this monster to good use, as they do with the Kudzu that is choking the landscape of the southern states.

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