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« One more Accidental Blogger! | Main | Bombed in Karachi (Omar) »

November 12, 2010

Comments

1. Max Planck.
2. Albert Einstein.
3. Albert Einstein.
4. None that he was aware of.
5. Georges Lemaître
6. They were Georges Lemaître's employer.
7. 2 billion years.
8. Pius XII
9. Georges Lemaître
10. John Paul II.
11. He believed that looking into the Big Bang, the moment of creation, was to look at God's work.
12. Stephen Hawking.
13. Stephen Hawking.
14. Werner Heisenberg
15. ???
16. Einstein.
17. Einstein.
18. The universe?
19. Into the future.

Great to see you here, Norman. I'm very poorly equipped to play, however. But Pete isn't! I will definitely forward the link around. Is it fair to research your answers? Or is it more like playing "Botticelli" -- you know it or you don't?

Welcome, Norman, and what a nice start! You could be the next Stephen Fry :)

1. That depends.
2. The inventor of the "equals" sign.
3. A very stubborn person.
4. Came up with "When in Rome..."
5. Hollywood.
6. Commissioned a bunch of paintings by Raphael depicting the sky.
7. Fifty years. He was 2 1/2 at the time.
8. The Disco Pope.
9. Phil Spector.
10. Pope...hey, look over there!
11. There were as of yet no international regulations requiring labeling of such research.
12. Lady Gaga.
13. Hendrix groupies.
14. Hordes of desperate Physics 200 undergrads.
15. Better TV reception.
16. DJ Action at a Distance.
17. Pumping Iron era Schwarzenegger. Oh, I thought the question read "physique."
18. My Thanksgiving Day waistline.
19. I guess you've never been stuck on a freeway in LA.


Elatia,

Looking it up is fine. It's a lot of fun for those who do.


Prasad,

I had no idea Stephen Fry asked the same question. I was going to ask an additional question, "Whose theory was debunked by relativity?" I'm sorry I didn't.

Thanks a lot.


Dean,

I think I'd have to give you credit for no. 6.


Dean,

Also, no. 14.


Pete,

It's time to put you out of your misery and give you the answers. You did very well.

1. Max Planck. Wrong. It was Galileo Galilei. He forever put to rest the falsity of Aristotle's notion that the natural state of any object is at rest. There is no universal reference to momentum and position. An object's momentum and position were relative to an arbitrary object.
2. Albert Einstein. Wrong. It was Friedrich Hasenöhrl in 1904. Hasenöhrl did not appreciate the implications of mass-energy equivalence.
3. Albert Einstein.
4. None that he was aware of.
5. Georges Lemaître
6. They were Georges Lemaître's employer.
7. 2 billion years.
8. Pius XII
9. Georges Lemaître
10. John Paul II.
11. He believed that looking into the Big Bang, the moment of creation, was to look at God's work.
12. Stephen Hawking.
13. Stephen Hawking.
14. Werner Heisenberg Wrong. Niels Bohr. However, it may be that Werner agreed and said the same thing.
15. ??? He suffered from airborne allergies, and the windy North Sea islands were a perfect place to find relief.
16. Einstein.
17. Einstein. Wrong. It was Sir Isaac Newton. His was an early version of the God of the gaps.
18. The universe? Wrong. It was space. Objects (matter) cannot go faster than light speed. Space is not an object or matter so it does not have the same limitation. This is Guth's inflationary theory.
19. Into the future.

Wow! At the risk of sounding like a dumb blond without benefit of being blond, Norman, I would almost have to be told how to look this stuff up. What can I say? "I just live here."

I remember when I was 9 my father telling me astrology had to be wrong, because however it looked to anyone looking, the stars did not line up a certain way -- at all. That Orion didn't really exist, especially not if you were on Mars, and that, anyway, we were all as permeable as Orion. I think I ran from the room. If only I'd known Daddy had been reading Galileo...

Prasad, you watch British quiz shows when you're not lunching Lisa Randall? I love it.

Dean, Raphael did not paint the skies for the Vatican -- that I know about. Please tell me if you know better, however. His best student, Giulio Romano, painted the night sky for the Gonzaga family in the ducal palace of Mantua. The Chamber of the Zodiac -- deep blue frescoed ceilings, dazzling and restful.

Now, tell me how you would measure the expansion of the immaterial, or of that which does not have the limitation of being either object or matter, in order to know the speed of light did not obtain. Why does this not fly in the face of any idea of measurement? Are you saying it's immeasurable in its expansion while being finite?


Prasad,

Is it true you know Lisa Randall? Of course you know her. If you invite me to lunch or dinner or breakfast when you will be dining with Lisa, I will pick up the tab. You can say we know each other from AB, and I happen to be in town. I'll see if Elatia will be available and we'll all have a treat.

I would assign research teams in my Psychological Research Methods classes. The teams would have names - prominent women in science. Lisa Randall is one of the names I used. Most of my students were women, and I thought it would be an inspiration for them.

Something is very special about the woman who proposed that gravity, the weakest force around, is actually force leaking from another universe.

Elatia: I certainly don't know better. In fact, I had in mind one Raphael with which I'm familiar, Madonna and Child with Book, and its luminous sky. The Vatican connection was a joke, prompted by the trivia questions. I really don't even know the provenance of the small work in Pasadena I so admire.


Dean,

Sorry. I have to take away credit for no.6.

Gosh, Norman. Is this what honesty and transparency get me?

Numbers 17 and 18 ....What was I thinking? It was "lots of fun" (that should explain some of the correct ones). I think Dean is honestly and transparently the winner. And I think Elatia's "Now, tell me how you would measure the expansion of the immaterial ...while being finite?" would make a great question 20.

Ah Norman, unfortunately I don't know her know her, like lunch her know her. I did take a course from Randall once and skipped doing all the work. Turns out that's not such a smart idea :)

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